1815 Redingote a la Hussarde

Regency Ball-1-2

 

For our  Regency stay in Bath I needed something for daywear. I had the evening attire, but apart from my riding habit, I didn’t have anything suitable. I had limited financial resources, but was able to put aside a few days for stitching – so the idea was to invest more in time rather than in the materials per se.  For Regency that simply meant using cotton:-) A quick browse though the costume books and boards, and I set my heart on that lovely redingote from the Kyoto Institute of Fashion, all in white cotton, with pom poms and insane amounts of piping.  Cotton fabric is cheap, so most of the expense would be the pompoms and the accessories – and so a decision has been made.

4801c5d3f574d71bc6483e2a73ace9ed

Materials:

6m of plain cotton ( for top layer and lining) ( approximately £45)

66 pompoms ( all handmade in cotton by Gina B) ( £120)

piping materials – cord and bias cotton tape – 36 metres ( !!!) ( £20)

10 pairs of hooks and eyes ( £2.00)

cotton lace ( broderie anglaise) – £12

calico for patterning

 

Time – about  20 hours

I experimented with the patterning first, to create the collar and upper bodice pieces. I used first the dummy and once I had the basics in place, I put it on myself, wearing stays ( modern dummies have  their busts in a very different position!)

IMG_20140917_101934 IMG_20140917_101946 IMG_20140917_102346 IMG_20140917_103703

The skirts and sleeves were easy, didn’t have to do mock ups from them but used my blocks – so far so good!

The tricky part was the piped elements – I have never done piping before, and although it is strange to embark on a heavily piped garment without prior experience, I do Like a challenge. So I read some instructions  ( very good introduction on Historical Sewing!)practiced  on a bit of spare cotton,  and then whizzed all 36 metres of it.

IMG_20140917_131049

that’s the first batch…

Then it was time to apply it onto the  tabs…

IMG_20140917_122422

tabs on the front panel of the skirts

IMG_20140917_140752 IMG_20140917_140756

took a few hours, that did, very boring hours… first the sirs, then the bodice, oversleeves and  and cuffs…

IMG_20140917_162618 IMG_20140917_163038 IMG_20140917_170015

It was at that point that I noticed that the slits on the hem, oversleeves and collar are well, let us say, distinctively feminine looking, and from that point on the redingote got a working name – The Pussy Frock….:-)

Next stage was to mount  the piped elements onto the proper pieces… this stage had to be done all by hand, and it took forever. to sweeten the labour, a suitable viewing was required…. 🙂

IMG_20140917_205259

IMG_20140917_220353

2 episodes later, one side is done…

IMG_20140918_110309

the oversleeves

IMG_20140918_110324

the cuff

IMG_20140918_140849

bodice piping mounted

IMG_20140918_173218

The pussies on the hem….

 

Once all the piping was sorted and on, the redingote was assembled, lined, hooks and eyes added, belt added – and then the pompoms were sewn on:-)

IMG_20140920_093830

 

all ready!

Regency Ball-3-2

Regency Ball-4-2

Regency Ball-45

Regency Ball-38

 

and then it struck me – I might actually need  a walking dress  to go on top of my petticoat….. we planned to do some  dance practice and redingote, lovely as it is, may not be the best choice to prance around the dancefloor…

a 4 metres of self striped cotton and 5 hours later I had a simple day dress sorted…

Regency Ball-53

Regency Ball-48

 

The proper hat was almost ready for Bath – almost, I had trouble with the cockerel feathers mounting so in the end I decided go go for a different bonnet – straw base decorated with ribbon s and flowers. I finished it later on – but still not happy with it, I am not re-thinking the feathers mount options….

still, for the time being we got this:-)

Redingote 2k-55 Redingote 2k-56 Redingote 2k-58 Redingote 2k-60

Redingote 2k-1

   As for the layers – I am wearing a linen chemise, a long line corset,  a petticoat,  a day dress, stockings, shoes, hats etc…. quite a lot.

  The whole outfit is surprisingly comfortable and the piping makes it quite heavy too.  the best things is, when it gets dirty, you just wash it  with no special care – after all, it is all cotton!

 What I need now is a spencer, I think…. and a woolen pelisse for colder days.. .and another ball gown….. 🙂

 Credits:

 clothes – Prior Attire;

 boots – unbelievably comfy ones from American Duchess – when they arrived I suspected the heel will chafe – but after 3 hours of walking and 2 hours of dancing, my feet were snug and comfy – so a great buy!

 umbrella – Sherri Light; I supplied the silk, Sherri covered an antique frame and added antique silk fringe. Love it!

 stockings, ribbons and  straw hat base – Dressing History

 pompoms – Gina B Silkworks

 photography –Pitcheresque Imagery

Advertisements

13 thoughts on “1815 Redingote a la Hussarde

  1. What marvelous talent…I want to be an elf on your shoulder watching and learning all the way through!!

  2. Stunning!! Absolutely stunning! I have loved this Redingote ever since I purchased the Kyoto book and you have made it come alive! Bravo!!!!
    Blessings!
    Gina

  3. First – I am in awe. Secondly – I love the dark green parasol, gold shawl, and purple ribbon on your bonnet. I’m all for fun color combinations. Thank you so much for your delightful photos and recreation!

  4. Reblogged this on Becoming Andromeda and commented:
    I am watching all of these wonderful peoples blogs and trying to learn from their experiences and I am now understanding I need to stop being scared and just get started.

    • you are absolutely right! go and experiment yourself, the best way to learn – by all means use all the help you can get, but in the end it is down to you – and I bet it will be worth it:-) good luck!

  5. Pingback: The Gold Gown, market and a Regency Ball 1015 | A Damsel in This Dress

  6. It’s just too gorgeous! woth every litle stitch I wager.

    So funny – here I am trolling the web for wardrobe inspiration for my own stay in Bath in 2016 and there you go!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s