Fifty Shades of Sepia…

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With the trailer of the film running amok in the internet and showing in every feed, we were a bit fed up with the 50 shades of Gray overexposure.  I do sincerely hope the film is going to be better than the book, which was a serious abuse of my gray matter – those who have read it know it, those who didn’t – well, if you fancy a badly written parody with hardly any plot, no character development worth speaking about and seriously bored soliloquies  and dialogues ( blessedly short, mind you  ) – have a go, you’ll enjoy it once you realize it is a bit of a parody:-). Anyway, fingers crossed the film will be at least a bit more interesting.

In the meantime, we decided to have our own 50 Shades – but in sepia… Lucas  went through our few last stock photoshoots ( the Edwardian corsetry and Stock photography) and picked out the most tasteful/funny/ridiculous/atmospheric  shoots of historical lingerie and render them in sepia….

 

Here is Mr. Sepia himself…

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and  his girls…

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Hope  you like the experiment – some of the corsets etc are still available in our shop!

Many thanks to our elegantly playful models : Miss Lilian Love, Helen Radlett, Adrianna Renarde  and Anett Novak

Photography –Picturesque Imagery – you can find more  images from the session here

 

1883 Walking Dress – tutorial

47. at Holkham (4)

 

Well, as much as I love flowing trains swishing behind me, there is no denying the sheer elegance and practicality of a walking-length costume. Considering that we do quite a lot of Victorian interpretation work in all seasons, particularly the muddy ones,  I had to consider making one that would not suffer damage when working on muddy floors or streets. Last winter we were hired again for Victorian Christmas celebrations at Holkham Hall, this time for 4 days; although I had already decided to make a nice winter polonaise with a train, I simply needed another outfit – and a practical one too.

1.christmas polonaise

The Christmas polonaise

A perfect excuse to make a walking dress, if I ever saw one, and since I had picked up some interesting silks at a recent market, the decision was made.

The inspiration – Harper’s Bazaar, Autumn costume 1883

2.Autumn costume 1883

Autumn costume 1883

 Materials:

Cotton for lining, 6m

Silk brocade 5m

Silk twill 3m

Interlining for the waistband/front vest

Antique buttons

Bones

Cotton tape (5m)

Velvet ribbon (2m – but cotton tape can be used here as well)

 

Patterns

Bodice: my own – well, I did adapt my wedding bodice pattern (again), experimenting with how to best  achieve the front with the ‘false vest’ effect . A similar pattern is available from Vena Cava (http://www.venacavadesign.co.uk/Products/1884_French_Vest_Bodice.html)

 

Skirts – again, I have adapted the pattern from my wedding skirt, simply by making it shorter at the back, so that with the bustle it was an even length. Similar pattern of a plain underskirt can be found here – http://www.venacavadesign.co.uk/Products/1885_Four-Gore_Underskirt.html

 

Apron front – adapted from: http://www.venacavadesign.co.uk/Products/1886_Autumn_Overskirt.html

 The Skirt.

If this is the first Victorian skirt you have ever made, then I recommended that you make a simple toile in calico, just to get the length, darts etc right. It is much easier to get the desired even hem when draping it on a dummy than when trying to wrestle with maths. Also, you can use the calico pieces as a template for future skirts, saving you loads of time.

  1. Cut out your pieces (in my case: front, 2 sides, 2 backs, plus waistband) in top fabric.
3.skirt fornt panel

skirt front panel

4.skirt side panel

.skirt side panel

5.skirt back panel

skirt back panel

 

  1. Place the pieces on lining and pin together. (You can cut the lining first and then the top fabric – up to you!)
  2. Cut carefully, but DO NOT unpin – leave the pieces as they are, pinned together. If your fabric is ‘slithery’, baste the two layers together.
6.all pieces cut out and pinned together with the lining

all pieces cut out and pinned together with the lining

  1. Sew in the darts on the front piece, and press.
7. sewing the dart

sewing the dart

9.darts sewn, inside

darts sewn, inside

8.darts sewn, right side

  1. Place the side panel onto the front, right sides together, and sew through all 5 layers. Repeat for all the other panels, making sure you leave the back seam open a little at the back – that’s your placket opening.
  2. Press the seams open. You can pink the seam allowances to limit for fraying before couching them down – or simply fold under and secure them with small stitches. For the placket opening, simply fold the edges under and stitch on the machine – even easier if you are using the selvage as I did
10. pinked seam

pinked seam

11.back opening

back opening

  1. Put the skirt on the dummy.  Make sure the dummy is wearing correct undergarments – a bustle cage or pad, and a petticoat. Pleat the back panel: knife pleats towards the back work best in my opinion. Pin the pleats in place and take the skirt off.

12. pleats pinned

  1. Prepare the waistband – either baste in the interfacing material, of if using a fusible one, fuse with the top fabric.
  2. Pin the waistband into the skirt, right sides together, and sew. Press, flip it over, securing the edges of the skirt and pin on the other side – then  fold the raw edges of the waistband under and sew – either by hand or by machine.

13.sewing the waistband

  1. Work the button hole and sew on the button.
  2. You can add a proper placket – a piece of fabric to cover the opening; since my skirt is to be worn under the apron, the opening will not be visible anyway, so I decided not to bother in this case…
  3. Put the skirt on the dummy again –this time you are working on the hem. Play with the arrangement of the skirt itself, as well – more often than not it will need tapes attaching at the side/back so that the fullness is contained over the bustle and not at the sides. Only once you are satisfied with the fullness distribution/tape arrangement should you have a look at the hem.
13a. tapes at the inside of the skirt, restricting the fullness to the back

tapes at the inside of the skirt, restricting the fullness to the back

  1. Adjust the hem length as necessary, making it even all around.  To finish it, fold the hem under and stitch. You can also add ruffles etc.
  2. Since my skirt was to be used a lot, I decided to reinforce the hem by using a strong cotton tape. A ruffle would go on outside of the skirt, (though you can also attach it on the inside – both work 🙂
14. pinning the cotton tape to the hem

pinning the cotton tape to the hem

15.sewing the tape to the hem

sewing the tape to the hem

16. hem on the outside

hem on the outside

  1. Ruffle – mine is of the silk twill, with cotton lining. Cut the ruffle (3 times the length of the hem usually works for me). Place the top fabric and the lining right-sides together and sew along one edge.
17.preparing the ruffle

preparing the ruffle

  1. Flip on the other side and press, positioning the seam not on the very edge, but slightly up on the wrong side, so that the lining is now longer at the top.  Stitch the top edge together, cutting out the excess lining.
  2. Pleat – Either pin every pleat, or cut corners- use machine ruffler (I love mine!) or a pleater.
18. pleating on the ruffler

pleating on the ruffler

18a. pleating on the pleater

pleating on the pleater

  1. Press and starch.
20,

pressed ruffle

  1. Once ready, pin and sew your pleats onto the skirt, right sides together.

21. ruffle being sewn

  1. Fold down and press. You may further secure the ruffle by stitching it to the hem by hand,
22. securing the ruffle to the hem

securing the ruffle to the hem

23. ruffle done!

ruffle done!

  1. Your skirt is now ready! 😉  – here the inside view

24. skirt on the inside

 

The overskirt.

  1. Cut out the pieces in fabric (and the lining, if you are lining it).
  2. Sew the darts into the front section
  3. Hem the pieces and add ruffle or any decoration you would like to use
26.adding the ruffle to hem med apron

adding the ruffle to hem med apron

  1. Mark the pleats at the sides and sew the pleats in place.
27. pleateing the sides

pleateing the sides

  1. The back – hem this, including the placket opening. Pleat according to the diagram on the pattern, then pin.
28. back pleats (2)

back pleats (2)

  1. You now have the apron, the back, and the waistband. Try the pieces on, pinning them to the dummy, or on yourself; Check that the pleats look the way you want them to . If all is ok, sew the back pleats and add the waistband.
29. checking the fit

checking the fit

  1. Position the back and front pieces on the waistband and pin in place. It will overlap a bit with the back piece on top, this is ok.  Try it on yourself, or on the dummy, to ensure that the fabric hangs properly. If necessary, you can still change the position of the pleats.
30.pinning the waistband, note the back piece overlaps the front -

pinning the waistband, note the back piece overlaps the front –

  1. Sew on the waistband, and finish as with the waist on the skirt. Finish all buttons and buttonholes.
31. finishing the waistband - pining

finishing the waistband – pining

32 -

waistband ready

  1. The front pieces will require a tape, as they will pull the apron into position. Stitch a length of tape (enough to tie over the bustle) at each side as indicated by the pattern.
33.tape sewn at the sides of the apron

tape sewn at the sides of the apron

  1. Your overskirt is now ready!

 

 The bodice.

Again, if it is your first bodice, do make a mock-up – do not rely on the pattern to fit perfectly well onto your corseted form! Needless to say, wear your corset for all fittings.  I made a mock up with two different fronts – one  sported one dart and the vest part sewn along the second one , and the other  had 2 darts and a vest added in a third seam. The first option worked much better for me, so I tweaked this side and used the pieces as a pattern for the proper bodice.

34.

mock up, experimenting with different positioning of darts and vest seam

35. tweaking the armscythe

 tweaking the armscythe.

 

  1. Cut out your pieces in top fabric.
  2. Place the pieces on the lining, pin together and cut. Do not unpin – treat as one layer. If the top fabric is slippery, baste the pieces together. Again, you can cut in reverse order as I did – lining first,
37. cutting out the pieces - here lining on top fabric, front piece

cutting out the pieces – here lining on top fabric, front piece

  1. Prepare the vest part – I decided to interline the silk twill to make the buttonholes sturdier. I also used the silk brocade as a lining for the twill. Sew the piece right-sides together along the front edge and bottom, press open, poke the corner, and flip onto the right side, press again. Pin or baste the other edges together and treat as a single piece.
  2. Sew the darts onto the front piece first.
  3. Sew all pieces of the bodice together, (don’t worry about the sleeves or collar for the moment), and try it on.  This is the last opportunity to make changes to the fit, neck or arm scythe shape, so DO take your time checking the fit.
38.trying it on - the front

trying it on – the front

39. the back

the back

  1. Time to work on the sleeves – sew the parts together, hem the cuffs and add ruffle, decoration, etc as required. Pin into the bodice and try on.

40. the sleeves

 

40a.sleeve cuff

sleeve cuff

  1. Once everything is in order, sew the sleeves into place.
41

sleeve pinned in, ready for stitching

  1. Press all seams open, or to one side; pink the seam allowances ( or fold over and secure with stitching)As for the seam connecting the sleeves to the bodice – use a cotton tape to enclose the seam, a simple, neat and period technique.
  2. Collar – place both parts (plus interlining) right sides together, sew along the top edge.

42.collar pieces

  1. Trim seam allowances, turn over, poke the corners out and press.
  2. Pin the collar into the bodice,( the top fabric and interlining but not the lining part) and sew. Fold over the lining and stitch, hiding the seam.
43. sewing the collar on - finishing

sewing the collar on – finishing

  1. Now for the edges – either pipe them, or bind them – I made binding in the brocade and bound all edges apart from the vest part. Sew the binding first, right sides together , flip open, press and fold over the seams, then sew the inside by hand.
44. sewing the self fabric bias bining to the edges of the bodice)

sewing the self fabric bias bining to the edges of the bodice)

  1. Mark the buttonholes  and work them – either on the machine or by hand
45. marking the buttonholes

marking the buttonholes

  1. Sew on the buttons.
  2. Pleat the peplum as indicated on the diagram , or as desired – and secure it with a  few stitches (or a piece of tape)
  3. Cut a piece of ribbon for your waist tape, ( grosgrain is best, but other tight-woven ribbons about 1inch wide will work as well), and stitch this at the back seam. Pin the tape at your waist, at the seams. Attach hooks and eyes in front – the tape will take some of the strain from the buttonsJ you can also attach the tape over the bones – will work just as well.
  4. Mark how long you want your boning to be and cut the bones.   File the ends and enclose the boning in the channel (here I used a few readymade ones).
  5. Sew the channels onto the seams, placing the boning over the tape . An excellent article on the boning and waist tape position in the bustle bodices can be found here- http://historicalsewing.com/boning-in-bustle-bodices
46. bones in the channels, stitched at the seams, on a front pannel

bones in the channels, stitched at the seams, on a front pannel

 

  1. Your bodice is ready!

Here the whole ensemble is worn at Holkahm Hall and Stoke Rochford, over the period undergarments.  ( and links to the articles on how to make the bustle cage and a petticoat )

49. at Holkham , back 48.at Holkham 50. at Holkham (3) LJP_9064 LJP_9177

 

 

 

Hot summer 1914

Edwardian Outfits July 2014-20

 

After the  WWI event at Hereford one thing became apparent – I  cannot wear my original mourning outfit in these temperatures! it was only silk, but black, and having it drenched with sweat was just a crime. So for the next WWI event, in St. Neots, I decided to  whiz something simple and more appropriate – a light cotton summer dress.

I had only 1 day to do just that – recent house move meant I  had to finish some commissions early and catch up with others after the move – but I managed to save up 1 day to get the frock sorted. I had a lovely cotton with embroidered border in stock (  to make one of the stock item dresses…) and decided to use that. my inspiration came from a few fashion plates picturing a skirt and a bodice/jacket combination – you can see the board here.

The whole thing turned out to be a bit more complex than I had originally imagined. The top needed a sitted waist ( underbodice) with the looser , longer layer being mounted directly on it. I did not have time to make a late Edwardian corset in lighter fabric, and my black one showed through the layers – so I had to use my early Edwardian corset – shorter and without suspenders, but it turned out to work just fine. I also added some vintage lace to the borders of the jacket…

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fitted waist under the looser layer…

The only pair of shoes I had, were my new Gibsons from American Duchess – and so to match them I found a scrap of beige silk in the scrap box and made a belt  to compliment the shoes – whatever as left of the silk went on the hat…

And so, the layers were –  The stockings, drawers and the chemise with a corset on top….

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then the petticoat in light cotton and lace…

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Camisole  and the skirt next…

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And then the jacket. It can be worn in 2 ways – as a cross over…

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or open in front, revealing more of the decorative waist…

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back view…

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 The hat was an original item, restyled just a bit – added silk bow, velvet ribbon , some bling and ivory and brown feathers.

 On the day I forgot my gloves – and felt half naked wondering around town looking for a shop that would sell anything suitable… Fortunately, lovely ladies in Beales found s the last few pairs of net gloves somewhere in the stock room – and they were perfect!

  Here am leaving for a day’s work on the second day – this time with a parasol as sun was merciless!

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The event itself, ran by St. Neot’s museum  and Black Knight Historical, was great – we chatted to the public, recruited nurses, encouraged young lads to join up – and talking about the impact the great War had on the history and everyday life…

St Neots WWI Comemorative July 2014-2

– and in between all that we sat at a nearby vintage cafe, enjoying amazing scones, tea and lemonade… If you ever are in St. Neot’s this place is well worth a visit –  Betty Bumbless Vintage tea Rooms.

St Neots WWI Comemorative July 2014-6

 I also spent some time making sketches  – to be used by one of the local artists –  and it turned out to be a real magnet for the public, and inspired a few very interesting discussions about the war fashions….

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At the end of the day we indulged in a little photoshoot session in the cafe – their first floor turned out to be a time machine – styling was mostly WWII, but generic enough for us to have a go at a few pictures…

St Neots WWI Comemorative July 2014-8 St Neots WWI Comemorative July 2014-9 St Neots WWI Comemorative July 2014-10 St Neots WWI Comemorative July 2014-12 St Neots WWI Comemorative July 2014-13

  Lastly, we paid our respects at the local monument…

St Neots WWI Comemorative July 2014-18

  All through the weekend the temperatures were scorching – and the new dress worked well – it was light, breathed well and I felt much cooler than in the black silk – success. in fact, it proved so popular that I got some more of the fabric to make another one, this time for sale:-). Considering the fact that in the next 4 years we will be doing quite a lot of the WWI events, I suspect I will be making a few more summer dresses, day dresses and walking suits… a few of them are already done, available in our shop! ore to come over the next few months….

 Credits:

 Photography – as always, huge thanks to Pitcheresque Imagery

 Shoes – American Duchess,

 Clothes ( my dress, Blue silk dress, and Lucas’ breeches (  try as I might, I simply couldn’t get out of making theses…) – Prior Attire

 gloves – Beales

Stock Photography Fun

Stock Regency & WWI-28

 

So we have got a new website – and it comes with a shop! Online shoo for some essentials has been on my to do list for quite some time,  and so I decided to go ahead with it. And your products need to be photographed, right? Well,  since we were moving house, we decided to get as many pictures sorted before we do so – and 2 long sessions have been set aside and done!

The first was a fun session with Miss Lilian Love – featuring our modern corsets – the elegant sheer…

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and a cyberpunk/sci fy underbust – in a few looks!

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Lady Darth Vader….

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then a week later we had Anett, and Adrianne..

preparations…

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and a few outtakes from the shoot…

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after the shoot the girls went to bed…. 😉

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The  next day  Helen joined us for more fun..

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and then Lizzie  got to model some more stuff too 🙂

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even I got to model one of our stock items!

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and after all the shooting was done, it was editing time – photos, of course, by Pitcheresque Imagery

All the items here ( and many more) are  already available in the shop – but will get a proper post on the shop at some point too!

Many thanks to all our models  for their hard work, creativity and simply being great company!